Ready, Able – and Waiting

The Air Force wants to buy an affordable helicopter now – one mostly developed and in service, modern, reliable, and survivable on the battlefields of the future.

30 years ago, the USAF competed those very requirements in the open marketplace. That solution has degraded over time to become a ragtag fleet currently going downhill, which the Air Force knows all too well.

Now, the USAF has funded an entirely new replacement helicopter fleet that will be second to none – the new Combat Rescue Helicopter (or CRH).

Getting to “Yes” for CRH

Already, the Air Force has completed a full and open competition. They are ready now to award their contract and begin producing their new Combat Rescue Helicopter – if the Department of Defense will let them.

It has been a long road.

The bidding process is done, the funds in place, and all that’s left is approval by the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Why this must occur. The men and women flying and maintaining the current aged aircraft work too hard, and spend far too much taxpayer money keeping old aircraft capable. And they’re doing this around the clock and around the world.

Why Combat Rescue Matters

The USAF knows we cannot put our rescue crews in unnecessary danger as they risk their lives “So others may live.” We cannot compromise the lives of our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines when in serious danger of death, exposure, injury or capture.

The Office of the Secretary of Defense and Secretary need to learn the degree to which the American public is behind the USAF to procure a new Combat Rescue Helicopter.

Air Force May Not Fund New Rescue Helicopters, Dooming Downed Pilots

“Are Congress and the Pentagon really going to allow budget sequestration to unravel the best opportunity we have to assure no warfighter is left behind in wartime? If that’s where we are headed, it won’t take long before Washington‘s preoccupation with deficit reduction begins producing tragedies in overseas conflicts.” Click here to read full article.

- Loren Thompson, Forbes.com, Sept. 17, 2013

Combat Rescue Crews Give Their Best, Shouldn’t We?

HH-60G Pave Hawk in combat search and rescue exercise

Multi-service combat search and rescue exercise, 2005.

Para-rescue jumper, night rescue exercise,